Acceptable Use Incident Log Template | DEV104-2

Acceptable Use Incident Log Template

The Acceptable Use Incident Log Template provides an example register of incidents relating to Acceptable Use violations. DEV104-2 AUP INCIDENT LOG covers date, ID, description, category, and status. Company users who identify or perceive an actual or suspected security problem should immediately contact the company IT Manager for the incident to be logged in Human Resources Incident Log. Users should not reveal account password or allow another person to use their account. Similarly, users should not use the account of another user. Access to company network resources should be revoked for any user identified as a security risk or a demonstrated history of security problems.

Access to the Internet is specifically limited to activities in direct support of official company business or for educational and research purposes. If any user has a question regarding what constitutes “acceptable use” he/she should check with their supervisor for additional guidance. Management or supervisory personnel should consult with the Information Services Manager for clarification of these guidelines. The company Internet access should not be used for any illegal or unlawful purposes. Examples include the transmission of violent, threatening, defrauding, pornographic, obscene, or otherwise illegal or unlawful materials.

Acceptable Use Incident Log Template Details

Pages: 01
Words: 40
Format: Microsoft Word 2013 (.docx)
Language: English
Manual: Human Resources
Category: Development
Procedure: Internet Email Acceptable Use Procedure DEV104
Type: Log

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Acceptable Use Policy Template | DEV104-1

Acceptable Use Policy Template

The Acceptable Use Policy Template provides a Acceptable Use Policy Example stating that Internet and social media access and messaging accounts are specifically limited to activities in support of official company business (e.g., sales, purchasing, education, research). DEV104-1 ACCEPTABLE USE POLICY covers acceptable use, inappropriate use, internet and messaging etiquette, security, and more.

If any user has a question regarding what constitutes “acceptable use” he/she should check with their supervisor for additional guidance. Management or supervisory personnel should consult with the Information Services Manager for clarification of these guidelines. All terms and conditions as stated in this document are applicable to all users of the network and the Internet connection.

These reflect an agreement of all parties and should be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of the State. All users must agree to abide by this policy by signing the Acknowledgement of Receipt and Understanding section at the bottom of the Acceptable Use Policy Template.

Any user violating this Acceptable Use Policy or applicable state or federal laws is subject to the loss of network privileges, state or federal enforcement, and any other disciplinary actions deemed appropriate.

Acceptable Use Policy Template Details

Pages: 02
Words: 702
Format: Microsoft Word 2013 (.docx)
Language: English
Manual: Human Resources
Category: Development
Procedure: Internet Email Acceptable Use Procedure DEV104
Type: Guide

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Disciplinary Notice Template | DEV106-1

Disciplinary Notice Template

Notations should be made in the employee’s file recording any offense committed using the Disciplinary Notice Template. Management reserves the right to terminate or discipline any employee as considered necessary in individual circumstances. This misconduct can occur simultaneously and then be written up individually or grouped together on one report. The disciplinary action taken is a result of the severity of the offense.

The first step for any misconduct is to communicate the poor performance to the employee. The employee should communicate how they will resolve the issue. A notation should be made in the employee’s personnel file using DEV106-1 DISCIPLINARY NOTICE. The notice should be kept for a period of no more than one year. The notation should include:

  • Employee’s name
  • Date of verbal warning
  • Misconduct description
  • Description of expected performance
  • Employee Explanation

Verbal warnings may be removed from the personnel file after 90 days if the problem does not arise again. If the situation continues, then the employee should be given a written warning.

Disciplinary Notice Template Details

Pages: 02
Words: 101
Format: Microsoft Word 2013 (.docx)
Language: English
Manual: Human Resources
Category: Development
Procedure: Employee Discipline Procedure DEV106
Type: Form

 

 

Performance Appraisal Template | DEV105-2

Performance Appraisal Template

The Department Manager should review the employee’s job description and complete the Performance Appraisal Template with their own comments in order to review with the employee. DEV105-2 PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL is intended to assist managers and employees in communicating and recording assessments of their performance, and establishing goals/areas for improvement. Managers should evaluate all applicable performance areas with the employee and discuss areas that the employee could improve upon.

Keep in mind the most important part of the appraisal process is the discussion of the evaluation with the employee. If the meeting with the employee is effective, it leads to a better understanding and relationship between the employee and the manager; clarifies the mutual objectives of the employee, the manager, and the company; and gives the employee a feeling of satisfaction regarding the areas of work in which they have done well.

The manager should use the meeting to discuss the employee’s performance and not the individual as a person. This means that if the manager must be critical of the employee’s performance, the manager should emphasize that it is the performance and not the employee who has slipped. People usually can look more objectively at the results of their work than at themselves.

Performance Appraisal Template Details

Pages: 02
Words: 47
Format: Microsoft Word 2013 (.docx)
Language: English
Manual: Human Resources
Category: Development
Procedure: Performance Appraisals Procedure DEV105
Type: Form

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Self Appraisal Template | DEV105-1

Self Appraisal Template

The employee should first review their job description, complete the Self Appraisal Template, and forward it to their Department Manager several days before their scheduled appraisal meeting. DEV105-1 SELF APPRAISAL should allow the employee to become more involved in the objectives of the performance appraisal process through an assessment of their own performance and provide the Department Manager with insight into the employee’s viewpoint.

Department Managers are responsible for conducting thorough, impartial, and timely performance reviews with employees who report directly to them. Performance reviews are a function of evaluating employees on the basis of their performance, while considering their length of time in the position in relation to the performance requirements for the position. Human Resources should forward to each Department Manager a schedule of all employees that report to them and their next scheduled appraisal date. The Department Manager should inform the employee of any upcoming appraisals and set a date for a meeting.

Self Appraisal Template Details

Pages: 02
Words: 76
Format: Microsoft Word 2013 (.docx)
Language: English
Manual: Human Resources
Category: Development
Procedure: Performance Appraisals Procedure DEV105
Type: Form

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Training Plan Template | DEV101-1

Training Plan Template

The Human Resources Manager should develop a Training Plan that supports and advances the company’s strategy. DEV101-1 TRAINING PLAN should address long and short-range needs, with clearly stated objectives, and a direct relationship to the company’s mission and goals. It should begin with new employee orientation and continue throughout an employee’s tenure. The Training Plan Template should outline the requirements for addressing:

  • The company’s job requirements.
  • Professional development needs.
  • New theories, techniques, and technologies.
  • Each department’s philosophy, purpose, values, and initiatives.
  • Applicable standards, statutory requirements, or the standards of recognized professional associations.
  • The amount of time and money required for all training and development programs.
  • The effectiveness of all training and development programs.

The Human Resources Manager should survey the training needs of all departments each year in order to update the Training Plan. Training and development needs may be identified through performance evaluations, quality assurance processes, or entity goals and objectives. The survey should identify weaknesses within the company that may be resolved through staff training and development.

Training Plan Template Details

Pages: 02
Words: 537
Format: Microsoft Word 2013 (.docx)
Language: English
Manual: Human Resources
Category: Development
Procedure: Training Development Management Procedure DEV101
Type: Guide

 

Training Request Template | DEV102-1

Training Request Template

To obtain approval and subsequent reimbursement for courses, the employee should complete a Training Request Template before registration. Programs can include seminars, university or trade school courses, self-study courses, instructional videos, or any other method, which is suitable for the purpose. Part I of DEV102-1 REQUEST FOR TRAINING should be completed and approved/disapproved by the employee’s supervisor and returned to the employee.

To receive reimbursement, the employee should complete Part II of the approved Training Request Template and attach copies of all grades and paid receipts and route to your supervisor for processing. Reimbursement for a course must be submitted within ninety days of course completion and the employee must have been currently employed by the company upon completion of the course.

Training Request Template Details

Pages: 02
Words: 106
Format: Microsoft Word 2013 (.docx)
Language: English
Manual: Human Resources
Category: Development
Procedure: Training Tuition Reimbursement Procedure DEV102
Type: Form

 

Performance Appraisals Procedure | DEV105

Performance Appraisals Procedure

The Performance Appraisals Procedure provides the format, frequency and objectives of employee performance appraisals and any corresponding salary adjustment.

The Performance Appraisals Procedure applies to all managers. (14 pages, 3138 words)

Performance Appraisals Guidelines:

Frequency – The performance of an employee is reviewed three months, six months and twelve months after employment and annually thereafter. A manager may give an interim review at any time without waiting for the scheduled time.

Responsibility – The individual responsible for direct supervision of the employee should conduct the performance review. If an employee reports to more than one person, then both managers should be involved in the review process.

Performance Requirements (Expectations) – Performance requirements represent the level of performance that is expected of employees in fulfilling the duties and responsibilities of a position. The manager responsible for a position should establish the performance requirements in the Job Description and ensures that they are effectively communicated to employees.

Performance Appraisal Responsibilities:

The CEO (Chief Executive Officer) should be responsible for the final approval of all salary adjustments, changes in job titles, or job responsibilities.

The Human Resources Manager should be responsible for coordinating performance review schedules, salary adjustments, changes in job titles, or job responsibilities with each employee, department and manager involved.

Department Managers should be responsible for preparing recommendations for salary adjustments, changes in job titles, or job responsibilities with each employee.

Performance Appraisals Procedure Activities

  • Performance Appraisals Guidelines
  • Appraisal Preparation
  • Appraisal Discussion
  • Salary Adjustment
  • Appraisal Conclusion

Performance Appraisals Procedure References

  • Pregnancy Discrimination Act
  • Title VII
  • Age Discrimination Act
  • Equal Pay Act
  • Americans with Disabilities Act
  • The Civil Rights Act of 1991
  • Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) of 1938

Performance Appraisals Procedure Forms

 

Managers often have a lot to do with their employees’ performance, or so conventional wisdom goes. They’re responsible for motivating their employees to turn out quality and perform at their best, as well as for organizing, training, and so forth. However, motivation is a “soft” skill that many managers just don’t come equipped with. Some have never been instructed at length on the topic of motivation, and it’s not a skill one easily picks up on their own. Therefore, many employees need to motivate better performance from within. If not, they lose interest and momentum.

So how do you, as the employee, take the initiative when your manager is unable to provide it?

7 Keys To Motivate Better Performance From Within:

1. FIND A CLEAR SENSE OF PURPOSE OR DIRECTION

If your manager does not provide you the “what, when, and why”…ask! Valuable project time is lost. Ask your manager for an example of what the finished product should look like. What are the project objectives? Are they SMART objectives? What are the milestones? Do you understand what’s expected of you?

2. CONTINUALLY ASK FOR YOUR MANAGER’S FEEDBACK

Don’t allow your manager to isolate him or herself. The manager may say, “You handle it”, but do they really mean it? Project review should be a required part of every process — in fact, the quality standard, ISO 9001 mandates reviews! Always ask (of yourself and your manager) what can be improved.

3. BE HONEST ABOUT YOUR SKILLS AND TRAINING

Do you have enough for the job in question? If not, can you get more — or more specific — training? Can anyone mentor you in this area? And does the company have a training plan in mind for you?

4. ASSESS YOUR RESOURCES

Specify what you will need to complete the project. Ask your manager how resources will be allocated and be sure you will be adequately supplied.

5. IF A PROBLEM (SETBACK) OCCURS, TELL YOUR MANAGER ASAP

As soon as you have the facts to rationally discuss the case bring it up to your manager. Present the facts clearly and logically. Present opinions, too, but be sure not to pass them off as facts. Try to offer one or more potential solutions, as well.

6. BE AN INFLUENTIAL TEAM MEMBER

Be part of the team. Don’t hold back on any of your ideas. Each team member must contribute something to the success of any project…otherwise, it’s not really a “team project”, is it?

7. AT THE END OF THE PROJECT, ASK YOUR MANAGER FOR FEEDBACK

There is always room for improvement, so learn from the praise and the criticism and incorporate it in subsequent projects. You can’t always rely on others to provide you the guidance and incentive you need to be an outstanding performer. Sometimes you have to take the initiative.

How Is Performance Reviewed?

You might go into the performance review feeling you did a “more-than-adequate” job, even if you can’t quantify it exactly. Then again, you might approach the review with a sense of foreboding. You’re not well prepared. Maybe you feel like you’re going to get slammed. Maybe you wish the shoe were on the other foot. Maybe you wish everybody would just forget about it.

Too often, employee performance reviews are an exercise with no apparent purpose, except to satisfy a regulatory requirement or follow a decades-old policy. We go through the motions but don’t accomplish anything. By conducting employee performance reviews the way we do, we miss so many opportunities for improvement.

Employee Discipline Procedure | DEV106

Employee Discipline Procedure

The Employee Discipline Procedure establishes the methods for progressive discipline that your company can use to provide employees with the opportunity to correct performance issues. The goal of any discipline is to correct the misconduct and modify the behavior, rather than to punish the employee.

The Employee Discipline Procedure applies to all employees and any level of employee misconduct. (10 pages, 2687 words)

Management should:

  • Maintain documentation of any misconduct and the negative impact observed on the employee’s work, or that of others.
  • Be fair to the employee. Consider their side of the story, and any evidence they have.

Discharging employees for misconduct is commonly misunderstood. Case law defines misconduct as a “substantial or intentional disregard of the employer’s interests”. Yet it also specifically exempts misconduct discharge for “inefficiency, unsatisfactory conduct, failure in performance as the result of inability or incapacity, inadvertencies or ordinary negligence in isolated instances, or good faith errors in judgment or discretion”.

Following a consistent discipline policy may provide some protection. Simple warnings may not be enough.

Employee Discipline Responsibilities:

All Employees are expected to monitor and enforce The company work rules equally to ensure consistent and equitable treatment.

The Human Resources Manager should be responsible for overseeing the discipline process, interfacing with legal counsel regarding discipline issues, and assisting any employee involved.

The Legal Counsel should be responsible for advising management on the laws regarding discipline issues and the rights of employees.

Employee Discipline Procedure Activities

  • Introduction to Company Misconduct
  • Response to Misconduct
  • Employee Written Warnings
  • Serious Employee Misconduct
  • Very Serious Employee Misconduct
  • Inexcusable Employee Misconduct
  • Employee Misconduct Investigations

Employee Discipline Procedure References

  • Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA)

Employee Discipline Procedure Forms

 

Internet Email Acceptable Use Procedure | DEV104

Internet Email Acceptable Use Procedure

The Internet Email Acceptable Use Procedure defines procedures for access to the Internet through your company’s network infrastructure. The acceptable use policy delineates specific standards regarding the use of email on your company’s computers.

The Internet Email Acceptable Use Procedure applies to all personnel with access to the Internet, e-mail, and related services through your company’s network infrastructure. (6 pages, 1695 words)

LAN, MIS, SPAM, and TCP/IP are abbreviations used throughout this policy. What exactly do they mean?

  • LAN – Abbreviation for Local Area Network, which refers to the cabling, servers, routers, hubs, switches, workstations, and other network equipment used to distribute and control access to information and/or the Internet by all employees.
  • MIS – Abbreviation for Management Information Systems, which refers to all computer, technology and information assets of the company.
  • SPAM – Unauthorized e-mail or other electronic messages that is typically distributed in large quantities.
  • TCP/IP – Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol refers to the IEEE Standard for transmitting data across network.

Internet Email Acceptable Use Responsibilities:

Information Services Manager is responsible for managing and administrating network access, security, and usage reporting.

Human Resources Manager is responsible for training, and explaining the network access, security, and usage policies to each new employee.

Users are required to acknowledge receipt and understanding of guidelines contained in this document. Users who violate the provisions outlined in this document are subject to disciplinary action up to and including termination. In addition, any inappropriate use that involves a criminal offense will result in legal action.

Internet Email Acceptable Use Procedure Activities

  • Acceptable Use
  • Inappropriate Use (Unacceptable Use)
  • Internet and E-mail Etiquette
  • Internet Security
  • User Compliance

Internet Email Acceptable Use Procedure Forms

 

Training Development Management Procedure | DEV101

Training Development Management Procedure

The Training and Development Policy ensures that your company has people with appropriate knowledge, skills and behaviors to meet both its long-term and short-term objectives. Implement our development management policy to allow each employee meet his or her full potential and career aspirations.

Training Development Management Procedure applies to all training, educational or seminar programs for all employees. (8 pages, 2031 words).

Training Development Management Responsibilities:

The CFO (Chief Financial Officer) should be responsible for overseeing the training and development plan to ensure that it supports the company’s objectives.

The Human Resources Manager should be responsible for the development and implementation of all training, employee performance, and development programs. The Human Resources Manager should coordinate training and development planning with each department manager to develop each employee to their potential and support the objectives of the company and department. The Human Resources Manager should be responsible for the tracking of all internal and external training and development records for each employee.

Department Managers should be responsible for the development and implementation of all training, employee performance, and development programs, in coordination with the Human Resources Manager, for each reporting employee.

Training Development Management Procedure Activities

  • Development Planning
  • Training Effectiveness
  • Training records
  • Training Courses
  • Performance Evaluations

Training Development Management Procedure References

  • Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) of 1968

Training Development Management Procedure Forms

 

How Do You Build a Learning Organization?

Invest In Your Human Resources… This oversight, however, seems to be all too common. Businesses are willing to invest in buildings, infrastructure, and equipment, while ignoring their most valuable asset, the people that make products, interact with customers, and run the internal processes that are vital to success. Instead, it is too common to find companies slashing training and development budgets.

Business experts who understand the keys to long term success usually take the opposite approach. They ask, “How can you afford NOT to invest in your employees?” A litany of research backs up this position. Studies show that there is a clear relationship between the investment into education, learning, and long term success.

Understand the Relationship Between Learning and Success

The importance of investing in knowledge is also found in the canon of business literature. Kaplan and Norton’s Balanced Scorecard give Learning and Growth a high degree of emphasis. They describe investment into employees as being required to achieve breakthrough results, and a key to success in a modern, competitive environment. Also, in “Building a Learning Organization,” a seminal article published in the Harvard Business Review, Professor David Garvin states plainly, “Continuous improvement requires a commitment to learning.”

Value All Types of Learning

In a larger sense, however, training and development shouldn’t always be just about job skills. In a true learning organization, all types of learning are valued. It’s important for organizations to be willing to embrace change and to understand what innovative leaders can mean to an organization. The concept of learning and knowledge goes hand in hand with these important concepts.

Organizations that value learning and knowledge are much more likely to be flexible and adaptable, and its members are more willing to embrace change. For example, in a learning organization the use of innovative methods and technologies will be more readily adopted and then will spread more quickly. It also gives associates a great opportunity to step outside the organization to learn and share with people from all types of businesses and fields. Sometimes the best innovations are not really new, but proven techniques applied in completely new ways. A line worker may learn something he or she can usefully apply from a personal finance class, and an accountant may devise an innovative accounting process from a seed sown while attending a cooking class.

Build Learning Into Your Strategy

For a true learning organization, education, training, and development cannot be an afterthought. As Balanced Scorecard describes, emphasis on learning and education have to be formed at the vision and strategy level. Then it can be built into objectives, budgets, and schedules without managers and supervisors feeling that education and training is taking someone “away” from their job. It is communicated and understood throughout the organization that learning is part of their job.

While there are abundant educational avenues that should be open for employees and managers to pursue, learning and education should not be done haphazardly. The path should be carefully selected and focused on meeting the needs of the company and the needs of the employees. While all learning does not have to come with a huge fee, a commitment to learning should be reflected in an organization’s budget, as well.

What are you doing to build a learning organization? Do you project a negative attitude about education and learning on the company’s time and dime? If that is the case, then your peers and subordinates might just have a negative attitude toward trying anything new or different. In today’s competitive climate, are inflexible and non-adapting workers really the human resource asset you need to succeed?

The environment the trainee returns to after a learning event has a lot to do with how much of the learning is practiced and retained. Complex cultural attributes are what guide the associate. For example, how is learning valued, how much control do employees feel over their own work, and how much supervisory and peer support do they receive?

Once you realize why you need to promote a learning organization, the next question is what kind of classes, seminars, or training can mutually benefit the company and the employee.

Training Tuition Reimbursement Procedure | DEV102

Training Tuition Reimbursement Procedure

The Training Tuition Reimbursement Procedure outlines the requirements for approved programs, employee eligibility and tuition reimbursements. Training reimbursement increases employee abilities in their present positions, prepares them for future positions, and keeps them current with new advancements or technologies.

The Training Tuition Reimbursement Procedure applies to all non-company’sponsored, training and educational or seminar programs. (4 pages, 582 words)

Training Tuition Reimbursement Responsibilities:

The Human Resources Manager should be responsible for coordinating training and development programs and reimbursement with each employee or department manager to develop each employee to their potential and support the objectives of the company and department.

Department Managers should be responsible for approving requests for training, in coordination with the Human Resources Manager, for each reporting employee.

Training Tuition Reimbursement Procedure Activities

  • Eligibility
  • Approved Programs
  • Reimbursement

Training Tuition Reimbursement Procedure Forms

 

 

How Should You Evaluate The Training Course?

Training is one of the essential elements of any business process improvement initiative. As a company undertakes a quality or process improvement initiative, new skills and concepts are required. While the training venue such as a public training course, a private in-house program or one-on-one coaching, is relevant, the content and methodology is critical for the training to be effective in changing behaviors and outcomes, or else you’re not getting value out of training.

SAFEGUARD YOUR TRAINING INVESTMENT

To assure a positive outcome and safeguard the investment in time and money spent, prospective students need to investigate their training options prior to enrolling and attending. Students and employers also need to evaluate the training reimbursement options. Consider these strategies prior to enrolling in or sending an employee to a class:

  • Decide which skills need to be addressed and how the content will apply it to current and future responsibilities.
  • Before the class, make a list of the top three to five skills/concepts you want to learn. Laying out clear expectations will force you to participate more fully and ensure you’re getting value out of training.
  • Find out how the course is structured. Does the instructor use a variety of techniques to reinforce the learning experience? Are there class exercises or small group projects? What percentage of the course is delivered via instructor lecture? Is there self-study or pre-course work involved? Can you contact the instructor after the course?
  • How do you learn? Do you learn most effectively by listening, reading or doing? Is your learning style compatible with the course approach?
  • Make sure that your expectations are realistic. If you are uncertain about the course design or need more detail about a particular class, contact the training company and verify. Often times, you can speak directly with the instructor.
  • Discuss with your manager or co-worker how each of these skills or concepts will help you do a better job after the training class.
  • Schedule a presentation to your team upon your return to work. Debrief as soon as possible after the training, especially while the ideas are fresh and clear. Share your new knowledge and enthusiasm with others and encourage them to consider a new perspective. Your training experience will not be helpful if it occurs in a vacuum.
  • Plan for the time you are out of the office and away from your daily responsibilities. If you are distracted by issues back at the office or receive phone calls throughout the day, the learning experience will be diminished.
  • Be sure co-workers call only in a case of true emergency. It is difficult to recover from distractions, regardless of their importance.

GETTING VALUE OUT OF TRAINING

Training is an investment in time, money, company strategy and the student’s skill level. If the training is done well, it will have a significant impact on the organization and the return on the investment will be incalculable.

Computer User Staff Training Procedure | DEV103

Computer User Staff Training Procedure

The Computer User Staff Training Procedure defines levels of training for computer users and for computer support staff. The computer training procedure also outlines goals and requirements on vendor-specific certifications. It also defines the training program related to Management Information Systems (MIS).

The Computer User Staff Training Procedure applies to all company LAN users, support staff for the help desk on all software and usage of all devices attached to those networks. (4 pages, 679 words)

LAN and MIS are two abbreviations regularly used in the Employee Computer Training Procedure. What do these stand for? LAN is an abbreviation for Local Area Network, which refers to the cabling, servers, routers, hubs, switches, workstations, and other network equipment used to distribute and control access to information and/or the Internet by all employees. MIS is an abbreviation for Management Information Systems, which refers to all computer, technology and information assets of the company.

Computer User Staff Training Responsibilities:

The Human Resources Manager should be responsible for coordinating computer training and development programs with the MIS Manager to develop each employee to their potential and support the objectives of the company and department.

The MIS Manager should be responsible for providing computer training and development programs to ensure each employee is capable of using the technology provided to support the objectives of the company and department.

Department Managers should be responsible for approving requests for training, in coordination with the Human Resources Manager, for each reporting employee.

Computer User Staff Training Procedure Activities